legaldesignpodcast

Episode 33: Tackling the Chaos Cycle of Insurances by Design with Anthony Novaes

Anthony Novaes.

Many people feel that terms and conditions of insurance contracts aren’t meant to be understood. It’s small print and full of industry specialized jargon, aiming at preventing legal risks, but, on the contrary, actually provoking them. In this episode Henna and Nina meet with Anthony Novaes, a Brazilian lawyer and legal designer, who explains the pain points of insurances and how to address them with the help of legal design.

People purchasing insurances that they don’t understand, causes problems on the next phases of the supply chain. All this makes the insurance industry the perfect candidate for legal design.

Insurance law is a one of the heavily regulated areas of law, which implies that there are many interests involved which need balancing, and particular groups that need governmental protection (or governmental control). The problem of heavy regulation is that it makes the market complex and unpredictable to navigate, especially for anyone who doesn’t have the training for that. Legal design can be of great help to make insurances more functional, and also prevent disputes related to them. Legal design can also offer alternatives to traditional legal regulation, as it can help create policy measures that satisfy the needs of the stakeholders better.

Anthony Novaes is a Brazilian Insurance, Reinsurance and Private Pensions Attorney. He is author of the first academic investigation on legal design applied to insurance and of articles focused on legal innovation, civil law, civil procedural law, legal design, and insurance. He has a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) from Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie and a postgraduate specialization in Insurance Law from Escola de Negócios e Seguros. He has attended the international executive program “Insurtechs: innovación y disrupción digital en seguros” from Pontificia Universidad Argentina and has additional degrees on design, law and innovation. He is currently specializing in Digital Business at Universidade de São Paulo. He is a member of the Brazilian section of Association Internationale de Droit des Assurances (AIDA Brasil), where he is a part of the national working group on Civil Liability Insurance. He was certified as a Legal Design Expert Practitioner by Legal Creatives. He is a teacher and coordinator of the course “Seguros 4.0” at Future Law, which offers the first discipline on legal design and insurance in the world.

Episode 32: Demystifying Legal Tech with Colin Levy

Colin Levy.

Legal Tech is one of the popular buzzwords you can’t help hearing when talking about the future of law these days. But what exactly is legal tech? That is what we’re going to cover in this episode with Colin Levy.

I see legal tech as sort of cultural movement to embrace technology, and some of the concepts that underly technologies in the practice of law and delivery of legal services. My goal, as I see it, is try to bring more and more people into the community and make it more broader and diverse.

Colin explains how legal tech is different from legal design and what kind of common misunderstanding people may have about legal technology. Colin also tells us what to consider when buying legal tech solutions or when designing technology for lawyers and their clients.

In addition, Colin also talks about how he sees legal tech as a cultural movement to embrace technology, and some of the concepts that underly technologies in the practice of law and delivery of legal services. 

Colin S. Levy is Director of Legal and Evangelist for Malbek, a leading CLM company as well as a seasoned lawyer and legal tech speaker.

Throughout his career, Colin has seen technology as a key driver in improving how legal services are performed. Because his career has spanned industries, he witnessed myriad issues, from a systemic lack of interest in technology to the high cost of legal services barring entry to consumers. Now, his mission is to bridge the gap between the tech world and the legal world, advocating for the ways technology can be a useful tool for the lawyer’s toolbelt rather than a fear-inducing obstacle to effective legal work. Colin has also been driven to effectively empower, inform, and inspire others not only regarding the law and legal services, but also tech, interdisciplinary collaboration, and process improvement.

Episode 31: Developing the Brazilian Legal System by Design with José Faleiros

José Faleiros Jr.

The Brazilian legal system is facing many challenges and undergoing major changes due to application of new technologies. As we know, law itself changes slowly but legal design can assist in this change and bring out the positive. This week we talk to José Faleiros Jr., a Brazilian lawyer and the co-editor and co-author of the book ”Legal Design: Teoria e Prática”.

We can’t deny that there are very complex problems to be solved. A solid judicial system is crucial for democracy. To be solid, it needs to be efficient and it needs to be trustworthy. Legal Design helps to create efficiency, and as a consequence, trust.

José tells about the Brazilian legal system and its challenges. For example, in 2020 the Brazilian judicial system had 75 million legal processes lacking a solution. A solid judicial system is also crucial for democracy. And to be solid, the system needs to be efficient and trustworthy and this is where legal design can help.

José Faleiros Jr. is a Brazilian lawyer and a Ph.D Candidate in Civil Law at the University of São Paulo and also a Ph.D Candidate in Law, Technology and Innovation at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. José has focused his professional work and his academic research on cyberlaw, especially on themes such as Internet regulation, personal data protection, AI impacts, blockchain, cryptocurrencies and tort law. José has long been interested in how design might have impacts on law and has dedicated himself to studying such impacts by investing in design as a hobby. Among other publications, he is the co-editor and co-author of the book ”Legal Design: Teoria e Prática”, published in Brazil by Editora Foco, in April 2021.

Building a Human Centric Brand with Dinko Kortzanov

Dinko Kortzanov.

I think this is where lawyers have not managed to change the branding (of their services): people are not 100 % sure that if they go to a lawyer, their problem will be fixed. This comes back to design thinking.  One of the universal traits of design thinking is that you want to empathize with the people so that you understand what they’re dealing with and what their problem is. And you want to reassure them that you have a solution to their problem.

Legal services are not famous for their human centricity. Quite contrary, legal services have a reputation for being expensive, unpredictable and lacking transparency. Design as a human centric method to enhance user experience would therefore have a lot to offer for legal services. Often lawyers might think that they are client-centric because it says so on their webpage, but how to make sure that they really are and how to start the journey towards client-centrism? And how can lawyers tell about their expertise in social media?  In this episode we have a pleasure talking to Dinko Kortzanov who work as a Managing Director in the oldest marketing communications agency in Finland – McCann – where he leads a data driven creative agency, specializing in using research, data and customer insights to help brands earn a meaningful role in peoples lives.

In addition to guiding us being more client-centric, Dinko shares his tips on how to do marketing and selling in legal industry. These topics aren’t thought at law school so selling and marketing might feel a little awkward for legal service providers. But Dinko’s brilliant advice will make selling process more client-centric and can actually help lawyers deliver more meaningful and value adding services to their clients.

But why should we stop using the word “sell” ? Tune in to hear the answer.

Dinko Kortzanov is originally from Bulgaria, having arrived in Finland in the late 80’s with his diplomatic parents. Growing up in an international and diplomatic environment gave birth to his passion about human centricity already at a young age.  

As his LinkedIn profile states, Dinko’s  “biggest enthusiasm comes from meeting different people and helping them solve all types of challenges successfully”.

He has 10+ years or experience from marketing, and has focused his passion by utilizing Design thinking methods for different problem solvings.Currently he’s working as Managing Director in the oldest marketing communications agency in Finland – McCann – where he leads a data driven creative agency, specializing in using research, data and customer insights to help brands earn a meaningful role in peoples lives.

Episode 29: Exploring Legal Design Methods and Tools with Angélica Flechas

Angelica Flechas.

If you are a designer, I really think you need to work with lawyers. Law is like a box no one wants to open, unless you are a lawyer, but now this box is being opened. And there are many lawyers who want to be part of this movement. If you are a designer you can be the bridge that connects these lawyers with the final user. And your tools are part of that process

There are many ways design can be practiced, also in the legal context. Many are familiar with the methods and tools highlighted in various service design books, such as making up different user personas and prototyping with legos and cardboard boxes. But what kind of methods and techniques legal designers like to use in their real life design projects? Are there some tools that work particularly well in the legal context?

In this episode we meet Angélica Flechas, who is a legal designer both with a law and design degree from Los Andes University in Bogotá, Colombia. Angélica runs her own service design consultancy agency HÁPTICA and has a wide experience from various service design cases both in legal and other industries. Angélica shares with us her favorite design methods and tools and tells how they work when designing legal products and services. One of them is called “Frankenstein”. We also discuss why prototyping is so important and how lawyers can easily start using it to improve their performance. Hint: your daily assignments are a potential test environment. Angélica also encourages designers to engage with legal design projects. Helping lawyers to bridge the gap between their services and the clients can have a significant social impact.

Angélica Flechas is a designer and a lawyer from Los Andes University in Bogotá Colombia. She has been working on service design for 8 years, after getting in touch and falling in love with this Design wave, when presenting a paper at the Global Service Design Conference in Helsinki in 2012 – Servdes. Six years ago, she decided to create her own Service Design Consultancy Agency – HÁPTICA – where she runs as Founder, Service and Legal designer Consultant, and as General Manager. She has worked for different industries such as: retail, finance, hospitality, health care, insurance, education, construction, government, law offices, among others. She is also a teacher in the undergraduate program for Business Administration at Los Andes University.

Episode 28: Do’s and Don’ts of Legal Innovation with Marco Imperiale

Marco Imperiale.

“I am not expecting law firms to be innovative, I’m not expecting law firms to be software houses. If I want a software, I go to a software house, if I want legal advice, I go to a law firm. I think for me the trick is to be in a law firm that is 20 to 30 percent more innovative than their peers.”

We are living very exceptional times to work as a lawyer. The innovation game is on in the legal industry, and law firms are not excluded from it. New legal roles are created and the dominant players are yet to emerge. Working as today’s lawyer differs greatly from the era of our grandparents, although it might be overwhelming to figure out what still has to change and what can remain. Should law firms of the day be like software houses and start selling legal design services?

In this episode we are joined by Marco Imperiale to discuss legal innovation, and its do’s and don’ts. Marco is an innovation and design thinking veteran in the legal industry and has years of experience in hands-on innovation work. Marco shares his thoughts and ideas about how to start the innovation work in law firms and what to focus on. For lawyers who are not that keen on the change, the good news is that there will always be a need for traditional legal expertise too. But to make the most of it for the clients, it’s good to start working in multidisciplinary teams and try to be at least a bit more innovative than the competitors. We also discuss why selling legal design services is so difficult, but why buying them is a good for any company that seeks for positive transformation. At the end of the episode Marco, who is also a trained mindfulness trainer, shares his tips for calming the mind in the midst of the busiest season.

Marco Imperiale is a lawyer, a mediator, and the head of innovation at LCA Studio Legale.He has extensive experience in legal design, legal tech, and in the interplay of copyright law and the entertainment industry. Whenever he finds time, he also works as a teaching fellow for Harvard Law School (CopyrightX course) and as a mindfulness trainer. Marco is an avid passionate of innovation in its broader meaning, and he is the author – together with Barbara de Muro – of the first Italian book on legal design, published by Giuffré Francis Lefebvre.

Episode 27: Merging Law, Design and Engineering with Lab de Diseño Para la Justicia

Laura Guzman-Abello, Santiago Pardo Rodríguez and Santiago De Francisco Vela.

We’ve discuss a lot about interdisciplinarity and team work in this podcast. Now it’s time to hear from from the experts how to merge design, legal and engineering expertise.

This week we discuss the role of interdisciplinarity, human emotions and engineering skills in legal design. We hear what lawyers, engineers and designers could learn from each other, and how to combine these three fields of expertise into one when designing better access to justice solutions. We also hear what positive design is and why lawyers should care more about emotions. But why would engineers already make great legal innovators? And what explains the popularity of legal design in Colombia?

Our guests in this episode lead The Design for Justice Lab, Lab de Diseño Para la Justicia, a joint venture founded in 2019 between the law, design and engineering schools in Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia.

The Lab integrates design thinking and systems thinking into law school curriculums with the purpose to improve the judicial system. Santiago Pardo Rodríguez is a lawyer and the founding member of the Lab, Laura Guzman-Abello is an industrial engineer engaged in policy design, and Santiago De Francisco Vela is a designer specialised in emotions and positive design. Together with their students this brilliant trio is on a mission to improve the future of law in Colombia. Tune in to hear how it is about to happen.

Santiago De Francisco Vela is a designer and professor in the School of Design at the University of Los Andes in Bogotá Colombia. He has been working in emotions and positive design, fostering emotional experiences and positive behaviors through product design. His areas of interest involve design for well-being, financial and social innovation, and behavioral design. He is a member of the Design for Justice Lab.

Laura Guzman-Abello is an industrial engineer who works in research and consultancy in design, strategy and organizational management oriented towards the design of public policy. Her work focuses on decision-making processes and engineering designs with a systemic and participatory approach. She has worked with public sector entities, international organizations, and universities. She is a lecturer of the School of Engineering at Universidad de los Andes and a Design for Justice Lab member.

Santiago Pardo Rodríguez is a lawyer, with an LLM from the Universidad de los Andes, an MSc in Law, Anthropology and Society from the London School of Economics & Political Science, and a Master of the Science of Law from Stanford University. His research areas are Constitucional Law, Judicial Systems, Empirical Legal Studies, and Legal Design applied to justice. He is a founding member of the Design for Justice Lab.

The Design for Justice Lab (DJL) is a joint venture founded in 2019 between the Schools of Law, Design, and Engineering of Universidad de los Andes that integrates design thinking and systems thinking to law school curriculums to think in new ways to overcome access to justice barriers in Colombia. The projects go through a process of exploration, ideation and prototyping with the purpose of improving the judicial system.
https://labjusticia.uniandes.edu.co/

Episode 26: Proactive Legal Information Design with Helena Haapio and Rob Waller

Rob Waller and Helena Haapio.

Making legal information more comprehensible and easier to use is a central theme in legal design. It is also a topic that has recently gained increasing research interest, sparking new ideas on how to enhance the usability of contracts and other legal documents in practice.

Research has shown that understanding what a document says, is all about human metacognition. If users are enabled to connect the content of a legal document with ideas that are meaningful to them, it can help avoid “cognitive accidents” and work as a proactive method to promote legal wellbeing of the users and other parties. When users can understand what is expected of them, legal conflicts and misbehavior due to misunderstandings are less likely to occur.

Rob and Helena share insights from their various projects and collaborations, like the contract simplification project with an energy industry facility and Canadian aboriginals. We also hear what proactive law is, and practical tips about how to improve the usability of legal documents. If you want to know what makes a good (legal) document, tune in!

Helena Haapio is a lawyer on a mission to change the way contracts and law are perceived, presented, and taught. She is a lawyer and contract strategist by day and a researcher, author, and editor by night. She has had the good fortune of working with information designers and plain language experts who have taught her a lot. She is a co-founder and co-creator of the WorldCC Contract Design Pattern Library and currently co-editing two books for Edward Elgar, one on Contract Design and the other on Legal Design.

Helena is an Associate Professor of Business Law at the University of Vaasa, Finland, and a Contract Strategist at Lexpert Ltd. In addition to her doctorate and LLM, she is proud to hold a Master of Quality degree. Like engineers, Helena wants everything she does to be functional, useful, and usable.

Rob Waller’s recent work is in the growing field of legal information design, working to improve consumer and business contracts through plain language, usable design and visualization. His other current focus is the Information Design Summer School, which introduces non-specialists to theories and techniques that help to simplify complex information.

​Semi-retired from a career in research, teaching and consultancy, Rob has more time now for renovating a 200-year-old stone barn, gardening and playing sax – where no one can hear him. His 1987 PhD explored the relationship between language and design, and he continues to look for better ways to explain this and unify them in practice. Rob the current President of the International Institute for Information Design.

Link to the article mentioned in the episode: Robert Waller, Jenny Waller, Helena Haapio, Gary Crag & Sandi Morrisseau, Cooperation through Clarity: Designing Simplified ContractsJournal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation, Vol. 2, Issue 1–2 (Special Issue: Contracting for Innovation and Innovating Contracts), 2016, pp. 48–68. Manuscript available at ResearchGate. ( Please note that this is a manuscript of an article accepted for publication in the Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation. To cite this article, please refer to the published version.)

Episode 25: Decoding Law with Neuroscience with Dominique Ashby

Dominique Ashby

At first, neuroscience and law may seem an odd combination. Neuroscience examines the human nervous system and tries to explain human behavior. When using this understanding in law, it will help us create better law, legislation, and policy. And lead to situations where rights and obligations are understandable for everyone.

Profound understanding of human behavior is a key to success in legal design projects. Where legal design doesn’t necessarily aim to nudge people to certain choices, it still seeks to influence people’s behavior in a positive way. When people’s cognitive and emotional needs are being met, and they can truly understand what is expected of them, they are more likely to make choices that support the legal wellbeing of themselves and others. Should every legal design team then have their own neuroscientist?

In this episode we discuss the possibilities of neuroscience in legal design with neuroscientist Dominique Ashby. Dominique tells us how neuroscience can help law to achieve it’s missions, and on the other hand, what are the perils of behavioral influencing. We also discuss the importance of brain health in work life. If you still brag with your working hours instead of your sleeping hours – this episode is for you!

Dominique Ashby is a former lawyer, who decided to bring her first passion, neuroscience, into the business world. In her own consultancy company, Neuro@Work, Dominique advises organisations in change management using the power of neuroscience. She has also experience from working with legal design teams.

Following a successful first career as a lawyer in private practice, in-house and with alternative legal providers, Dominique decided to bring her first passion, neuroscience, into the business world.  Dominique takes the headache out of change for organisations with strategies and toolkits based in neuroscience that reduce resistance and increase productivity during times of change. Using the power of neuroscience she helps us all reach our full potential at work.

Episode 24: Rights at the Museum with Dina Bailey

Dina Bailey

In this podcast series we have learned that law and lawyers look back way too much when solving problems. And we have also learned that design thinking encourages us to look ahead to the future when solving problems. So now you might be wondering if Henna and Nina are going back to traditional way of doing law by bringing up museums. Not to worry though, in this episode with Dina Bailey we learn what designers and lawyers could learn from museums and their curators!

Museums and exhibitions are special venues for learning. Museums can use techniques and tools that create immersive, sensory experiences, evoking human emotions and thoughts unlike any other forms of communication. This way museums can effectively promote positive change through learning.

Museums play a key role in enhancing the public’s understanding of human rights and promoting respect to others. Using different tools and techniques, such as storytelling, photos, and interactive displays, museums help us examine the past violations of human rights and remember those who were affected. Exhibitions will leave visitors with more knowledge but also evoke empathy. And empathy plays a key role in preventing future injustices.

Dina Bailey is the CEO of Mountain Top Vision, a consulting company that works with organizations on trainings and strategic initiatives that support more inclusive communities. She has been the Director of Methodology and Practice for the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience, the inaugural Director of Educational Strategies at the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, and the Director of Museum Experiences at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, and a high school English teacher at Pike High School.

Dina holds a Bachelors in Middle and Secondary Education, a Masters in Anthropology of Development and Social Transformation, and a graduate certificate in Museum Studies. She has been an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University and at George Washington University; and, she has been published in both the formal education and museum fields. Dina is proud to be the Secretary of the American Association for State and Local History, the DEAI Committee Co-Chair on the board of the American Alliance of Museums, and the Chair of the American Alliance of Museums’ Education Committee.